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AUD (Australian Dollar)

The Australian Dollar represents the economy of Australia and is the fifth most commonly traded currency in the world.


The Australian Dollar had a fixed exchange rate until 1983 when the Australian Labor government floated the currency. The Australian Dollar was part of the Bretton Woods system from 1946 to 1971 with which the Australian Dollar was pegged to the British Pound (which was fixed to the US Dollar which was pegged to Gold) until 1967. As Bretton Woods began to break down, the value of the Australian Dollar was converted to a traditional peg against a floating US Dollar.

AUD News and Analysis

Heavy Event Risk in Jobs Data, Rate Decision Will Confront Summer Trading
We are in the full swing of Summer trading conditions, but will a focus on monetary policy and unease in investor positioning break the quiet?
US Dollar as ‘Data Dependent’ as the Fed as NFPs Approach
There are periods where the Dollar finds its price action is divorced from the influence of regular event risk. This does not look to be one of those times.
Australian Dollar Looks to RBA, US Jobs Data to Drive Volatility
The Australian Dollar is likely to turn volatile anew as the RBA monetary policy announcement and much-anticipated US jobs data comes across the wires.
Monetary Policy Speculation Continues Next Week With NFPs, RBA and BoE
There is key monetary-policy related event risk next week in the US NFPs, RBA rate decision, and BoE’s first Super Thursday. Here’s what to watch.
Weakest Wage Growth Since 1982 Shocks USD Out of Intraday Rally
Traders are taking the data as an ominous sign for US consumption, thereby drawing into question the viability of a Fed rate hike in September.
Breakout on Tap Next Week? USDOLLAR Index Eyes Flag Top
End of month rebalancing flows may curb the greenback's attempt to run much higher before the weekend.
AUD/USD Technical Analysis: Looking to Sell on Bounce
AUD/USD Consolidates; Resistance Up to about .7340
Dollar Forecast Improves, Indicator Shows it May Rally Across the Board
The US Dollar has held key support levels versus the Euro, Sterling, and Japanese Yen. Here’s why it might continue higher against most major FX counterparts.
Australian Dollar Forecast to Fall Further
Retail FX crowds remain steadily long the Australian Dollar versus its US namesake, and a contrarian view of ‘herd’ sentiment leaves us with a similarly steady bearish...

Australian Dollar Trading Forecast

Symbol Forecast Outlook

Forex Economic Calendar

Current Time:

GMT022:13    

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Date Time Currency Event Importance Actual Forecast Previous Notes
There are no events scheduled.

In 1983, the Australian Dollar was set to a free-floating exchange rate that could reflect the balance of payments and market drivers for the Australian economy.


Australia is noted for being the first country in the world to move to a complete system of bank notes made from polymer or plastic, first introduced in 1988 with the entire currency converted in 1996.


Of recent, The Australian Dollar was a favorite of carry traders as the commodity boom helped keep interest rates elevated while much of the developed world struggled with contractionary economic pressures. Interest rates were very low in developed economies such as The United States, Japan, and Europe and traders could borrow funds in these economies to invest in higher rates in Australia. This helped to drive The Australian Dollar to all-time highs against the US Dollar in 2011.